wordpress, online marketing
Written by Stu Kushner

Top 5 Ways to Increase Your Visitor’s On-Site Time

By Tom Ewer

online marketing, On Site Time

You make an assumption when building a WordPress site. That assumption is that people will look at everything you want them to look at, just because it’s there.

In an ideal world, yes, the quote from Field of Dreams would ring true: “If you build it, they will come.” However, the problem has more to do with keeping visitors on your site rather them getting them there in the first place. Increasing your visitor’s on-site time has been directly linked, time and time again, to increasing lead generation and conversions.

So basically, you need to be concerned with this very important factor of web development. Thankfully, there are many ways you can optimize the visitor’s experience to increase on-site time right from within WordPress.

1. Add Infinite Scroll to Posts

WPMU DEV cites Atlantic Media’s Quartz magazine as a good example of this technique put into practice. When you read posts on this site, you’ll notice a funny thing once you arrive at the bottom of the page — a new post loads automatically. This is inspired, because instead of asking the reader if they want to read something else on your site, you automatically present new content for them to read. The mere act of scrolling presents another piece of related content, which is practically guaranteed to increase on-site time.

You can add infinite scroll on your WordPress site by installing a plugin designed for the job.The most popular choices out there right now are as follows:

Infinite-Scroll

Infinite Scroll Plugin

The Infinite-Scroll plugin is simple and straightforward. For most themes, all you have to do is activate it and it will automatically work on all of your post pages. When a visitor nears the bottom of a page of posts, the next page will be automatically loaded. There’s …read more    

website design, website marketing
Written by Stu Kushner

Don’t Host Your Own Website

website design, website marketingMy cousin has a website. His name is M. I won’t say his real name because his website is so bad that I would be embarrassing him to publicize it. It was created in 1990 by his intern. It is horrible. That said, he is very interested in having me design a new website for him and I would love to do that but there is one major issue.

He wants to host the site himself.

For M, I think he feels like he will save money on hosting. We don’t charge very much to do a website design. But we do charge to host, manage and do marketing work on the website. This pricing structure enables us to work on the site and to maintain an ongoing relationship with our clients. So, we would have to charge a lot more to design the site if M insists on hosting it. But, that said, letting M host his own site is a mistake.

Why is it a bad idea?

Hosting a website requires a Server that has very specific software installed on it. He probably does not have a WordPress compatible Server. Also, websites today are nothing like websites designed in 1990. Back then, most sites were in HTML. Today, most sites are built around CMS platforms (like WordPress, Joomla and Drupal) that create a complicated framework around the site. This framework provides amazing new tools for business. It gives the business executive total control of his/her content and great marketing tools too. Hosting his own site is an admirable goal but impractical. Websites are complicated. They can get hacked, viruses and they can crash.

Everything is complicated. I don’t do my own taxes and I don’t fix my car. I leave it up to professionals so that I can concentrate on the things I know how to do best. Don’t host your own website. Leave it to the professionals.

Your comments are welcomed.

Website Design, Internet Marketing, DC, SEO, Content
Written by Stu Kushner

Allow All Users to Experience Your Content

 Website Design, Internet Marketing, DC “How often should I…?” is one of the most common beginnings to questions when it comes to any aspect of online marketing.  Unfortunately there isn’t always a clear cut answer for every part of the equation.  Even if you follow other successful businesses’ formulas when it comes to blog and social media schedule there is no guarantee that your followers will engage your efforts similarly.

According to information gathered by online research company Visibli the average Facebook post has already received more than half of its “likes” before the time it is ninety minutes old.  Following the first few hours’ engagement slows a bit until the average post has almost

Read More